Canes Venatici Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

In today’s article, we’re discussing Canes Venatici constellation facts to help you identify, locate, and understand it.

Canes Venatici Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

What is the Canes Venatici Constellation?

The Canes Venatici constellation is located in the northern sky. Its name means “hunting dogs” in Latin.

The constellation is relatively small and contains only four stars. Two of those stars have planets.

These stars are Chara and Cor Caroli.

Canes Venatici represents the hunting dogs of Boötes the Herdsman.

The constellation was first delineated by Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century.

It is bordered by Ursa Major to the north, Coma Berenices and Virgo to the south, Boötes to the west, and Leo Minor to the east.

What are the Mythological Associations of the Canes Venatici Constellation?

While there are no myths 100% focused on this constellation, the constellation is often associated with other popular and well-known constellation myths.

The stars of Canes Venatici are said to be the hunting dogs of Boötes, who pursued the bears that became Ursa Major and Ursa Minor.

They also show up in other mythological stories, but in minor roles.

History of the Canes Venatici Constellation

The Canes Venatici constellation has been known by many cultures throughout history.

The Babylonians knew the constellation as ARAKU, which meant “the stags”.

The constellation was also known as PRINCEPS JUNIOR and JUNO’S STAGS by the Romans.

The Chinese knew the constellation as TIAN LIAN, which meant “the celestial hunting dogs”. The constellation was also known as SHEN LIAN and SHEN YUAN by the Chinese.

The Persians knew the constellation as  SHERATAN and MUSHASHIYAN. The Turks knew the constellation as KURḐABAKI.

The Canes Venatici constellation was also depicted in the early Egyptian Dendera Zodiac as HENUT-RESHEF.

Ptolemy listed the stars of the Canes Venatici constellation in his 2nd century work, Almagest.

How to Find the Canes Venatici Constellation?

The best time to see the Canes Venatici constellation is in the month of April. It is visible in the northern hemisphere and can be seen at latitudes between +90° and -60°.

Can the Canes Venatici Constellation Be Viewed Without a Telescope?

Yes, the constellation can be seen without a telescope.

However, a telescope will be needed to see the stars in the constellation more clearly.

Canes Venatici Constellation’s Meteor Showers

The Canes Venatici constellation is associated with two meteor showers. The April Camelopardalids and the Bootids both peak in the month of April.

The April Camelopardalids are a minor meteor shower that produces about 5 meteors per hour. The Bootids are a minor meteor shower that produces about 10 meteors per hour.

The best time to see the April Camelopardalids is in the early morning hours of the first week of April. The best time to see the Bootids is in the early morning hours of the last week of April.

The best place to see the meteor showers is in the northern hemisphere. However, they can also be seen in the southern hemisphere.

Canes Venatici Constellation Deep Sky Objects

Some of the notable deep sky objects in Canes Venatici include:

The Whirlpool Galaxy (Messier 51): This is a spiral galaxy located about 23 million light years away from Earth. It can be seen with a telescope.

The Canes Venatici Dwarf (CVn I): This is a dwarf spheroidal galaxy located about 3.8 million light years away from Earth. It can be seen with a telescope.

The Cigar Galaxy (Messier 82): This is an irregular galaxy located about 12 million light years away from Earth. It can be seen with a telescope.

The Sunflower Galaxy ( Messier 63): This is a spiral galaxy located about 25 million light years away from Earth. It can be seen with a telescope.

The Herschel 400 Catalogue: This is a list of 400 galaxies, nebulae, and star clusters that can be seen with a telescope.

The Canes Venatici constellation also contains several star clusters. These include the NGC 4449 Cluster, the NGC 4627 Cluster, the NGC 4656 Cluster, and the Beehive Cluster.

The Canes Venatici constellation also contains several double and binary stars.

These include the stars Porrima, Asellus Primus, Asellus Secundus, Chara, Nu2 Canum Venaticorum, and Xi2 Canum Venaticorum.

Wrap Up

Have you had any luck locating the Canes Venatici Constellation? Let us know in the comments section below.

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