Chamaeleon Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

In today’s article, we’re discussing Chamaeleon Constellation facts to help you identify, locate, and understand it.

Chamaeleon Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

What is the Chamaeleon Constellation?

The Chamaeleon Constellation is one of the 88 modern constellations that were first defined by the International Astronomical Union in 1930. It is located in the southern sky. Its name means “the little chameleon” in Latin.

It is also called the Frying Pan in the southerm hemisphere.

Where is the Chamaeleon Constellation?

The Chamaeleon Constellation is located in the southern sky.

Specifically it is located in the second quadrant of the southern sky (SQ2) and can be seen at latitudes between 0° and -90°.

What are the boundaries of the Chamaeleon Constellation?

The Chamaeleon Constellation is bordered by constellations Ara, Carina, Mensa, Octans, and Volans.

What are the Stars in the Chamaeleon Constellation?

There are four stars in the Chamaeleon Constellation that are brighter than magnitude 4.0. They are:

– Alpha Chamaeleontis (also called Toliman). This star is the brightest in the constellation. It is an orange giant with a magnitude of 2.61, and is about 150 light years away from Earth.

– Beta Chamaeleontis (also called Cha). This star is a white dwarf with a magnitude of 4.07, and is about 380 light years away from Earth.

– Gamma Chamaeleontis (also called Asellus Australis). This star is an orange dwarf with a magnitude of 4.24, and is about 36 light years away from Earth.

– Delta Chamaeleonum (also called Asellus Borealis). This star is a yellow-white dwarf with a magnitude of 4.35, and is about 40 light years away from Earth.

There are also two stars in the Chamaeleon Constellation that have been given proper names by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). They are:

– Zeta Chamaeleontis (also called Chamele mandatory name, from the Greek “khemaeleon” meaning “chameleon”). This star is a binary system consisting of two orange dwarf stars with magnitudes of 4.72 and 5.59, and is about 33 light years away from Earth.

– Eta Chamaeleontis (also called Chamaleon). This star is a blue-white subgiant with a magnitude of 4.88, and is about 310 light years away from Earth.

What are the myths associated with the Chamaeleon Constellation?

There are two myths associated with the Chamaeleon Constellation. One is that it represents the shape-shifting god Proteus.

Proteus was a sea god who could change his shape at will.

The other myth is that it represents the giant chameleon, Typhon.

Typhon was a monstrous creature with a hundred heads who was defeated by Zeus.

How Big is the Chamaeleon Constellation?

The Chamaeleon Constellation has an area of 132 square degrees.

What are the Deep Sky Objects in the Chamaeleon Constellation?

There are several Deep Sky Objects in the Chamaeleon Constellation. They include:

– The Antennae Galaxies (also known as NGC 4038 and NGC 4039). These are two spiral galaxies that are in the process of colliding with each other. They are about 60 million light years away from Earth.

– The Chamaeleon I Cloud (also known as Cha I). This is a molecular cloud that is about 500 light years away from Earth. It is the closest star-forming region to our Solar System.

– The Chamaeleon II Cloud (also known as Cha II). This is a molecular cloud that is about 800 light years away from Earth.

– The R Coronae Australis Cloud (also known as the R CrA Cloud). This is a molecular cloud that is about 500 light years away from Earth. It is the site of ongoing star formation.

– The Bok Globule (also known as CB 34). This is a dark cloud of dust and gas that is about 500 light years away from Earth. It is in the process of collapse, and will eventually form new stars.

How can I find the Chamaeleon Constellation in the night sky?

The Chamaeleon Constellation is located in the southern hemisphere. It can be seen best in the month of August.

To find it, look for the four bright stars that form a rectangle.

These stars are Alpha, Beta, Gamma, and Delta Chamaeleonum. The constellation is also located near the constellations of Scorpius and Sagittarius.

Can the Chamaeleon Constellation Be Viewed Without a Telescope?.

Yes, the Chamaeleon Constellation can be seen without a telescope. However, a telescope will allow you to see some of the Deep Sky Objects in the constellation, such as the Antennae Galaxies and the Bok Globule.

Chamaeleon Constellation’s Meteor Showers

There are two meteor showers associated with the Chamaeleon Constellation.

They are the Chiornid Meteor Shower and the April Chiornid Meteor Shower.

The Chiornid Meteor Shower occurs in February and March.

It is produced by debris from Comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher.

The April Chiornid Meteor Shower occurs in April. It is produced by debris from Comet Pons-Winnecke.

What is the best time of year to see the Chamaeleon Constellation?

The best time of year to see the Chamaeleon Constellation is in the month of August.

Wrap Up

The Chamaeleon Constellation is a interesting constellation to study. It has many bright stars and deep sky objects that make it worthy of exploration.

With a little bit of effort, you should be able to find and identify it in the night sky.

Have you had any luck locating the Chamaeleon Constellation? Let us know in the comments section below.

Chamaeleon Constellation Facts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Previous Post

Cephus Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

Next Post

Circinus Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars