Corona Borealis Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

In today’s article, we’re discussing Corona Borealis Constellation facts to help you identify, locate, and understand it.

Corona Borealis Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

What is the Corona Borealis Constellation?

The Corona Borealis constellation is located in the northern sky, and its name means “northern crown” in Latin. It is a small constellation, and its brightest star is called Alphekka.

It was first  catalogued by the Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century AD.

Corona Borealis is thought to represent the crown of Ariadne, the daughter of Minos in Greek mythology.

The Corona Borealis constellation is a member of the Ursa Major constellation family, which includes  constellations like Ursa Minor, Leo, Canes Venatici, and Ursa Minor.

What are the boundaries of the Corona Borealis constellation?

The constellation Corona Borealis is bordered by Hercules to the north, Boötes to the west, Serpens Caput to the south, and Ophiuchus to the east.

How Big is the Corona Borealis Constellation?

The Corona Borealis constellation takes up an area of about 180 square degrees.

What are the stars in the Corona Borealis Constellation?

There are several stars in the Corona Borealis constellation. The brightest star is Alphekka, which is also known as Gemma.  Other stars include:

Tania Australis

Delta Coronae Borealis

Nu Coronae Borealis

Gamma Coronae Borealis

How can I see the Corona Borealis constellation?

The best time of year to see the constellation Corona Borealis is in the spring. It is visible in the northern hemisphere from late March to early May.

In the southern hemisphere,  it is visible in the fall, from September to early November.

To find the Corona Borealis constellation, look for the “northern crown” of stars near the bright star Arcturus in the Boötes constellation.

What Is The Mythology Associated With The Corona Borealis Constellation?

There are several myths associated with the Corona Borealis constellation. One story says that it is the crown of Ariadne, the daughter of Minos in Greek mythology.

Ariadne was given a golden crown by the god Dionysus, and after she died, it was placed in the sky by Dionysus to honor her.

Another story says that the Corona Borealis constellation represents the crown of Cepheus and Cassiopeia, the king and queen of Ethiopia in Greek mythology.

Their daughter Andromeda was chained to a rock as a sacrifice to a sea monster, but she was saved by the hero Perseus.

After Perseus killed the monster, he placed the crown of Cepheus and Cassiopeia in the sky as a constellation.

Corona Borealis Constellation’s Deep Sky Objects

There are several deep sky objects in the Corona Borealis constellation. These include:

The Blinking Planetary: This is a planetary nebula that is about 1,500 light years away from Earth. It gets its name from the fact that it appears to blink when observed with a telescope.

The Ring Nebula: This is a planetary nebula that is about 2,000 light years away from Earth. It is one of the most famous deep sky objects, and it appears as a ring of gas surrounding a central star.

The Corona Borealis Supernova Remnant: This is the remains of a star that exploded about 10,000 years ago. It is about 5,000 light years away from Earth.

Can the Corona Borealis Constellation Be Viewed Without a Telescope?

Yes, the Corona Borealis constellation can be seen without a telescope. It is a small constellation, and its brightest star, Alphekka, is visible to the naked eye.

Corona Borealis Constellation’s Meteor Showers

There are two meteor showers associated with the Corona Borealis constellation. The first is the Northern Crown Meteor Shower, which occurs in late April or early May.

The second is the Corona Borealis Meteor Shower, which occurs in late September or early October.

Wrap Up

The Corona Borealis Constellation is a interesting constellation to study.

It has many stars and deep sky objects that make it worthy of exploration.

With a little bit of effort, you should be able to find and identify it in the night sky.

Have you had any luck locating the Corona Borealis Constellation? Let us know in the comments section below.

Corona Borealis Constellation Facts

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