Antlia Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

In today’s article, we’re discussing Antlia constellation facts to help you identify, locate, and understand it.

Antlia Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

What is the Antlia Constellation?

The Antlia constellation is one of the 88 official constellations that were first identified by the Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century.

Antlia is located in the southern sky and its name means “pump” in Latin.

This constellation is not very bright and it is one of the larger constellations, taking up an area of 1068 square degrees.

It is bordered by constellations Centaurus, Hydrus, Pyxis, Vela, and Vindemiatrix.

What are the Mythological Associations of the Antlia Constellation?

There are no mythological associations with the constellation Antlia.

History of the Antlia Constellation

It is one of the constellations that was created in the 18th century by French astronomer Nicolas Louis de Lacaille.

Lacaille named this constellation after an air pump that was used to inflate balloons.

Lacaille also named many other constellations after scientific instruments, including Microscopium, Telescopium, and Norma.

How to Find the Antlia Constellation?

The best time to find the Antlia constellation is in springtime.

It is located in the third quadrant of the southern hemisphere (SQ3) and can be seen at latitudes between +40° and -90°.

The constellation is best visible in the evening sky from March to May.

Can the Antlia Constellation Be Viewed Without a Telescope?

Yes, the Antlia constellation can be viewed without a telescope.

However, it is not a very bright constellation and it can be difficult to find.

The best way to find it is by using the stars Alpha and Beta Centauri as a starting point.

Antlia Constellation’s Notable Stars

Some of the notable stars in Antlia include:

Alpha Antliae ( also known as “ HD 81688”) is the brightest star in this constellation and it is an orange giant star that is about 325 light-years away from Earth.

Beta Antliae is the second brightest star in this constellation and it is a yellow-white giant star that is about 350 light-years away from Earth.

Gamma Antliae is a white giant star that is about 470 light-years away from Earth.

Delta Antliae is a red giant star that is about 650 light-years away from Earth.

Antlia Constellation’s Meteor Showers

There are no major meteor showers associated with the constellation Antlia.

Antlia Constellations Deep Sky Objects

Some of the notable deep sky objects in Antlia include:

NGC 2997 is a spiral galaxy that can be seen with a small telescope. It is about 25 million light-years away from Earth.

IC 2177 is a large emission nebula that can be seen with a small telescope. It is about 3,000 light-years away from Earth.

NGC 3132 is a planetary nebula that can be seen with a small telescope. It is about 2,000 light-years away from Earth.

(A nebula is a cloud of dust and gas in space. A planetary nebula is what is left of a star after it has exploded. A large emission nebula is a cloud of gas and dust that is glowing because it is being ionized by a nearby star.)

Fun Facts About the Antlia Constellation

  • The constellation Antlia is home to the farthest known star, “Imsari”.
  • Imsari is a red dwarf star that is about 22.5 light-years away from Earth.
  • Antlia is one of the constellations that form the “Southern Cross”.
  • The Southern Cross is a group of five bright stars that are located in the southern sky. It is a popular symbol of Australia.
  • The Antlia constellation is also home to the “Antlia Dwarf Galaxy”.
  • The Antlia Dwarf Galaxy is a dwarf spheroidal galaxy that is about 11 million light-years away from Earth.

Wrap Up

Have you had any luck locating the Antlia constellation?

Let us know in the comments section below.

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Antlia Constellation Facts

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