Corona Australis Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

In today’s article, we’re discussing Corona Australis Constellation facts to help you identify, locate, and understand it.

Corona Australis Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

What is the Corona Australis Constellation?

The Corona Australis constellation is one of the 88 modern constellations that the International Astronomical Union has recognized. It is located in the southern sky. Its name means “southern crown” in Latin.

Corona Australis is a faint constellation with no particularly bright stars. It is best known for housing the south celestial pole, which is the point in the sky around which all stars appear to rotate.

It was first catalogued by the Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century CE.

Corona Australis is home to two stars with confirmed planets.

How Big Is the Corona Australis Constellation?

The Corona Australis constellation spans an area of 128 square degrees.

This makes it one of the smaller recognized constellations in the night sky.

Where Is The Corona Australis Constellation?

The Corona Australis constellation is located in the southern sky.

It lies in between the constellations Sagittarius and Scorpius. Other neighbors include Ara and Telescopium.

It is best seen in the months of February and March.

What Are The Stars Of The Corona Australis Constellation?

There are no particularly bright stars in the Corona Australis constellation. The brightest star, Alpha Coronae Australis (aka Meridiana), has a visual magnitude of 2.61.

There are two stars with confirmed planets in the constellation: HD 142022 and HD 169142.

HD 142022 is a binary star system located about 220 light years away from Earth. It consists of two orange dwarf stars orbiting each other  every 24 days. One of the stars has a Neptune-sized planet in its habitable zone.

HD 169142 is a young star located about 130 light years away from Earth. It has a Jupiter-sized planet in its habitable zone.

There are also several deep sky objects located within the constellation, including the Corona Australis molecular cloud, the Southern Pleiades star cluster, and the Blair Valley Radio Array.

The Corona Australis molecular cloud is a star-forming region located about 600 light years away from Earth. It is thought to be in the early stages of forming new stars.

The Southern Pleiades is an open star cluster located about 380 light years away from Earth. It contains about 100 stars,  many of which are young and still in the process of forming.

The Blair Valley Radio Array is a collection of radio sources located about 3.5 million light years away from Earth. It is believed to be the remnants of a galaxy that collided with our own Milky Way galaxy billions of years ago.

What Is The Mythology Associated With The Corona Australis Constellation?

The Corona Australis constellation is associated with the myth of the Titan Atlas.

According to Greek mythology, Atlas was a Giant who was sentenced to hold up the sky for eternity after he lost a bet with Zeus.

The constellation is said to represent the crown that Atlas wore as he carried out his punishment.

Can the Corona Australis Constellation Be Viewed Without a Telescope?

The Corona Australis constellation can be viewed without a telescope.

However, because it is a faint constellation, it may be difficult to see all of its stars with the naked eye.

Binoculars or a small telescope may be necessary to get a good view.

When Is the Best Time to View the Corona Australis Constellation?

The best time to view the Corona Australis constellation is in the months of February and March.

This is when the constellation is highest in the sky and therefore easiest to see.

Corona Australis Constellation’s Meteor Showers

The Corona Astralids  is a meteor shower associated with the Corona Australis constellation.

It occurs every year in early mid-March .

The best time to view the shower is after midnight when the constellation is highest in the sky.

Other Interesting Facts About Corona Australis

-The constellation is home to the Corona Australis molecular cloud, which is a star-forming region.

-In Chinese  astronomy, the stars of the Corona Australis constellation are part of an asterism known as the Black Tortoise of the North.

-The Greek poet  Aratos mentioned the Corona Australis constellation in his poem Phainomena.

Wrap Up

The Corona Australis Constellation is a interesting constellation to study. It has many stars and deep sky objects that make it worthy of exploration.

With a little bit of effort, you should be able to find and identify it in the night sky.

Have you had any luck locating the Corona Australis Constellation? Let us know in the comments section below.

Corona Australis Constellation Facts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Previous Post

Coma Berenices Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

Featured Article

Edit in Customizer > Popcorn Options > Post Settings