Lynx Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

In this article, we will take a look at the Lynx constellation. We will discuss its history, mythology, and some of the stars that are located within it.

Lynx Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

Constellations are one of the most interesting things in the night sky.

They are like a map that can help you find your way around the stars.

The Lynx constellation is one of the 88 constellations that were identified by the International Astronomical Union.

It is located in the northern sky, and it was first cataloged in the late 1600s.

Lynx is a fascinating constellation to study, and it is home to many different stars.

Where is Lynx located?

Lynx is located in the northern sky.

It is visible all year round, and it is one of the largest constellations.

Lynx is bordered by Camelopardalis to the north, Auriga to the west, Gemini to the south, and Ursa Major to the northeast.

Since the 1600s, Lynx has been associated with the mythical creature of the same name, and its position in the night sky reflects this.

Lynx is a faint constellation, and it is not easy to see with the naked eye.

However, it can be seen with binoculars or a telescope.

What are some of the stars in Lynx?

Lynx is home to many different stars in the Lynx constellation, 97 of which have been identified by the International Astronomical Union.

Even though the constellation is faint from Earth, it contains some exciting stars.

Let us take a look at some of them.

Alpha Lyncis

The brightest star in Lynx is known as Alpha Lyncis.

It is an orange giant star that is located about 203 light-years away from Earth.

It has a magnitude of 3.4, and it is one of the stars that make up the constellation’s figure.

Alpha Lyncis has evolved past the main sequence stage of its life and is now a Mira variable.

It is about twice the size of our sun and about 4,000 times more luminous.

10 Ursae Majoris

This binary star system is located in the northwestern part of Lynx.

It is about 53 light-years away from our sun and has a magnitude of 3.9. 10 Ursae Majoris consists of two stars, both of which are orange dwarf stars.

They orbit each other every 1,600 years and are about the same size as our sun.

The star system is thought to be about 3.8 billion years old.

WASP-13

Wasp-13 is a yellow-white dwarf star that is located in the southern part of Lynx.

It is about 653 light-years away from Earth and has a magnitude of 10.4.

WASP-13 is a very young star, and it is still in the process of forming.

It is thought to be about 10 million years old, and it is about 1.5 times the size of our sun.

The star is also named Gloas, which means glossy finish.

XO-5

XO-5 is a binary star system that is located in the northeastern part of Lynx.

It is about 912 light-years away from our sun and has a magnitude of 12.

XO-5 consists of two stars, both of which are yellow dwarf stars.

The stars can’t be seen without the use of a telescope and are interesting because they are so close to each other.

38 Lyncis

This is a multiple-star system that is located in the northern part of Lynx.

It is about 120 light-years away from our sun and has a magnitude of 4.

It consists of two stars: a blue-white dwarf, and the other is said to have a lilac hue.

38 Lyncis is a beautiful star to study if you have a telescope.

XO-2

XO-2 is a binary star system that is located in the southwestern part of Lynx.

It is about 500 light-years away from our sun and has a magnitude of 11.8.

XO-2 consists of two stars, both of which are orange dwarf stars.

They orbit each other every three years and are just about the same size as our sun but a bit cooler in temperature.

HD 75898

This star is known as an 8th magnitude star that is located in the southeastern part of Lynx.

It is about 255 light-years away from our sun, and it has a magnitude of 8.6.

HD 75898 is a metal-rich star that is thought to be about 3 billion years old.

It is about 1.4 times the size of our sun and is a lot cooler in temperature.

21 Lyncis

This star has a blue-white hue, and it is located in the northeastern part of Lyncis.

It is about 270 light-years away from Earth, and Lyncis is a single star that has a magnitude of 4.6.

21 Lyncis is one of the stars that make up the constellation’s figure and is thought to be about 2.7 billion years old.

It is also a lot bigger than our sun, being about two times its size.

What’s the History of the Lynx Constellation?

Johannes Hevelius was the one who created the Lynx constellation in 1687.

It is located between the constellations of Ursa Major and Auriga, and it is a faint constellation.

Hevelius chose to name it Lynx because of its shape, which resembles that of a lynx’s head.

Due to how faint the constellation is, it can only be seen in very dark skies.

Hevelius even noted that only the best of eyes could see it.

Astronomer John Flamsteed used the constellation in his catalog in 1712, and it has been used by other notable astronomers ever since.

If you are interested in the stars and constellations, then you should definitely check out the Lynx constellation.

It is a faint constellation, but it is still a beautiful one, and there are many stars and star systems included in the Lynx constellation.

Each star is unique in its own way, so go out and find this beautiful constellation in the night sky. Grab a telescope and see for yourself how amazing it is.

Lynx Constellation Facts

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