Cephus Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

In today’s article, we’re discussing Cephus Constellation facts to help you identify, locate, and understand it.

Cephus Constellation Facts, Myth, Location and Stars

What is the Cephus Constellation?

The Cephus Constellation is found in the northern hemisphere. It was named after Cepheus, the King of Aethiopia in Greek mythology.

It is a member of the Perseus family of constellations, along with Andromeda, Cassiopeia, Cetus, Lacerta, Pegasus, Perseus, and Triangulum.

It was catalogued by Ptolemy in the 2nd century CE.

Where is the Cephus Constellation?

The Cephus Constellation is located in the third quadrant of the northern hemisphere. Its right ascension is between 3h 50m and 7h 3m. Its declination is between +28° and +70°.

It is bordered by the constellations of Camelopardalis, Cassiopeia, Draco, Lynx, and Ursa Minor.

The Cephus Constellation is best visible in the month of November.

How Many Stars Does the Cephus Constellation Have?

The Cephus Constellation has 7 stars with known planets. It has 14 stars with Bayer/Flamsteed designations.

Some of the notable stars in the constellation are:

– Alderamin (Alpha Cephei): The brightest star in the constellation with an apparent magnitude of 2.45. It is a white A-type star that is 48.4 light years away from Earth.

– Errai (Gamma Cephei): The second brightest star in the constellation with an apparent magnitude of 3.23. It is an orange K-type star that is 36.7 light years away from Earth.

– Alfirk (Beta Cephei): The third brightest star in the constellation with an apparent magnitude of 3.5. It is a yellow-white B-type star that is 520 light years away from Earth.

What is the Mythology Associated with the Cephus Constellation?

The Cephus Constellation is named after King Cepheus of Aethiopia, who was married to Cassiopeia and was the father of Andromeda.

In Greek mythology, Cepheus was tricked by Poseidon into killing his daughter Andromeda as a sacrifice to save his kingdom from Cetus, a sea monster.

Andromeda was chained to a rock and left as bait for Cetus. She was saved by Perseus, who killed Cetus and then married Andromeda.

The constellation of Cetus represents the sea monster, while Andromeda represents the princess and Perseus represents the hero.

How Big is the Cephus Constellation?

The Cephus Constellation takes up an area of 588 square degrees. It is bigger than the constellations of Camelopardalis and Lynx but smaller than the constellations of Cassiopeia and Triangulum.

What are the Deep Sky Objects in the Cephus Constellation?

There are several deep sky objects in the Cephus Constellation. Some of the notable ones are:

– Messier 77 (NGC 1068): A spiral galaxy with an apparent magnitude of 9.6. It is about 47 million light years away from Earth.

– NGC 2438: An open cluster with an apparent magnitude of 10. It is about 4,900 light years away from Earth.

– IC 4593: A planetary nebula with an apparent magnitude of 11. It is about 3,000 light years away from Earth.

– SH 2-155: A reflection nebula with an apparent magnitude of 10. It is about 2,700 light years away from Earth.

Can the Cephus Constellation Be Viewed Without a Telescope?.

Yes, the Cephus Constellation can be viewed without a telescope. The brightest star in the constellation, Alderamin, can be seen with the naked eye.

The other stars in the constellation can be seen with binoculars or a telescope. The deep sky objects can be seen with a telescope.

Cephus Constellation’s Meteor Showers

The Cephus Meteor Shower is active from November 17-26. It peaks on November 21. The meteor shower produces about 5 meteors per hour.

The meteors in the shower are produced by dust particles that were left behind by Comet Wirtanen. The comet orbits the Sun every 5.4 years.

The Cephus Meteor Shower is not as active as some of the other meteor showers, but it is still a good one to watch.

Some of the other meteor showers that are active in November are the Leonids, the South Taurids, and the North Taurids.

The Leonids meteor shower is active from November 6-30.

Wrap Up

The Cephus Constellation is a interesting constellation to study. It has many bright stars and deep sky objects that make it worthy of exploration. With a little bit of effort, you should be able to find and identify it in the night sky.

Have you had any luck locating the Cephus Constellation? Let us know in the comments section below.

Cephus Constellation Facts

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